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1Password is an essential app

Today I posted a Facebook status that I've come around and consider 1Password a must-have app for every Mac user. A friend commented that he didn't get it, much for the same reasons I held out for a long time. So here's how I explained my new love:

Yeah I didn't 'get' the benefit for a long time. But recently I've been frustrated with the countless number of passwords I've got and how every site has a different policy that forces me to rethink my password scheme. I started to feel like my scheme was becoming too simple just so I can meet the lowest common denominator. Also, I recently find myself forgetting the less frequently used password and needing to reset them. I needed a solution.

The killer features for me:
  1. Killer browser integration, replaces Firefox and Safari password managers
  2. Password generator, now I don't need to fear that my online passwords are crackable. Again #1 makes #2 awesomely simple.
  3. Slick iPhone integration. I can take and update my passwords anywhere. Better Mobile Safari integration would be nice, but that's due to Apple's limitations.
  4. Master password: I know, I know, single point of failure right? I'm now of the opinion its much more likely a hacker will get access to one of my passwords online and figure out my simple scheme rather than them gaining access to my computer and cracking my rather complex master password. For me its more peace of mind and the simplicity of not having to memorize all my different passwords.
  5. Easy syncing via Dropbox. I want autofill not just cross-browser but cross-computer too. http://webworkerdaily.com/2008/09/29/1password-dropbox-sync/
Oh and I remembered to search for coupon codes before buying it. I used "iSlayer" which gave me 20% off.

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